• Sermon Series:
  • 1 Peter
  • 1 Timothy
  • What is a New Testament church supposed to look like? What is it meant to do, and how is it to be organized? Paul's letter to Timothy, pastor of the church in Ephesus, supplies the biblical answer to these questions. As CRBC organizes as a church, Tom Chantry is preaching through this important book. The aim of these messages is to build a basic understanding of the nature of a biblical church.

  • A Psalm of Ascents - Pilgrim Psalms
  • Birth of the Lord Jesus
  • Christian Servanthood and Stewardship Within the Local Church
  • Church Membership
  • What is church membership, and why do we encourage it? Our constitution urges Christians to seek membership in the local church. We view membership more in terms of responsibilities than privileges. The church is a community in which members may expect certain behaviors from one another. This series summarizes the biblical arguments for those expectations. Of course, participation in such a community caries with it profound benefits. Those benefits may only be experienced, however, by committing oneself to the church.
  • Constituting Weekend
  • On this special weekend CRBC formally became a self-governing church, and Tom Chantry was installed as an elder. Special speakers preached sermons throughout the weekend.
  • Deuteronomy
  • Ecclesiastes
  • Postmodernists often complain of the meaninglessness of life. Attempts to create meaning are ridiculed as hopeless. Christians may struggle to know how to address this “new” attitude in the world. In reality, though, the problems of today are not at all new. Solomon encountered the same difficulties nearly 3000 years ago. The book of Ecclesiastes traces his various attempts to find meaning and his ultimate realization that only true religion and dedicated service to God can give meaning to life. Tom Chantry has been teaching through this book on Wednesday nights.

  • Ephesians
  • Esther
  • The book of Esther has rightly been called a treatise on the Providence of God. It is a most unusual portion of Scripture - one in which God Himself is never named. Through this device we are reminded that even when He works invisibly, God always works. Like ourselves, Esther did not live in an age of miracles, but she served a God who nevertheless controls the events of this world and works them to His own ends. It is also a book intended to bolster our faith in God. Insurmountable difficulties melt away like spring snow as soon as God turns His eye upon them. The people of this God may bear up under the worst of circumstances, certain that He will work all things together for their good.

  • Genesis
  • From the origins of the earth and of mankind to the origins of God's covenant to redeem a people, this first book of the Bible provides us with foundational understanding of many of the most basic and critical teachings of Scripture.  Along the way, we learn the essential character of God, our all-knowing, all-powerful, and all-loving Father.  Failure to understand the teachings of Genesis is certain to render any Christian incapable of fully exploring the riches of Biblical truth.
  • Haggai
  • When the chaos of a sinful world and the difficulties of day to day life overwhelm God's people, they must often be reminded of the priority of the work of God. Haggai ministered for a brief period (only 4 months!) in Jerusalem after the return from captivity. His message was one of admonishment and encouragement to those who had forgotten the need to give of their time and energy to the Lord. His message rings true in every age in which Christians find themselves too overwhelmed by hardship to make the things of God their top priority.

  • I John
  • Isaiah
  • James
  • The Letter of James could be titled, "A practical guide to living the Christian life". James was the head of the Jerusalem church until 62 AD when he was martyred. With this brief letter, James instructs authentic Christians how to live a distinctly Christian life. He speaks authoritatively about trials, suffering, guarding our tongues and dealing with sin in our lives. Two thousand years after it was first penned, James' letter is still relevant, helpful and beneficial to Christians. It is one of the oldest letters in the New Testament.

  • Joel
  • Joel may have been the very first of the “Writing Prophets.” Certainly his writing demonstrates for us all the elements of the prophetic task. As he first warns and then encourages Israel in the midst of a devastating plague, we learn the patterns of the Lord’s sovereign work through the ages.
  • Jonah
  • It's not just a cute story about a whale.
  • Life of Samuel
  • How can a godly man hope to persevere in a time of moral chaos among God's people? What can one man do when even spiritual leaders have sunk into unrepentant sin? Samuel, the last judge of Israel, lived in just such a time. His entire ministry was one in which he stood in opposition to the wicked men who ruled God's people. His life demonstrates consistent faith in God through an extended period of setbacks and disappointments. Although he died before the spiritual darkness had lifted, God used his ministry to usher in a period of genuine revival.

  • Mark
  • NONE
  • Individual Sermons
  • Proverbs
  • Psalms
  • The book of Psalms begins with a couplet - two Psalms which clearly fit together and which introduce the major theme of Psalms. Each Psalm tells the same story of two men - one wise and the other wicked. However, while the first Psalm only describes what these men will be, the second shows us the hard reality of life. Often the wicked seem to thrive. The answer to this disjunction is found by opening up a new perspective and allowing us to see these men through God's eyes. The Psalms, then, reveal both God and His Son to us as the great Lord of all of history, bringing it to a glorious conclusion for the sake of His own glory and praise.
  • Reformed Distinctives
  • A series of five messages on our definition of 'Reformed'. The subjects are neither the Five Points nor the Five Solas. Rather, they define the word 'Reformed' in five distinct but complementary ways. We examine the Reformed Perspective on the Bible, on History, on Salvation, on the church, and on the Christian life.

  • Romans 6
  • The death of Jesus Christ has broken the power and authority of reigning sin.

  • Ruth
  • Servants in the Church
  • Special Message
  • Teachings That Define Our Church
  • What are the teachings that define our church? More importantly, where did we find those doctrines? Are they anything more than the musings of theologians? In this series we will examine the key doctrines by which we identify ourselves. We will see that our beliefs are firmly rooted in Scripture, which is our only authority.

  • The Christian's Obedience
  • Society does not respect the laws of God for the simple reason that those laws run contrary to our sinful nature. However, these laws reveal the character of God. As those who have known the full revelation of God's nature in Jesus Christ, Christians ought to render glad obedience.
  • The Coming of the Lord
  • God sent His Son into a time of darkness, but He did not send Him without preparation. Luke shows us how carefully God prepared the way before Jesus, so that those who were waiting for Him in faith would rejoice at His coming.
  • The Gospel of John
  • Having identified Jesus Christ, the Word, as being God and being with God, it would be natural for John to be faced with a request for clarification: just what God is he talking about? He supplies this by looking at the question from the angle of Creation. Jesus is the One through whom all things were created; He is the Creator God. This revelation gives clarity to the method of Creation which, in the Old Testament, is said to be "by the Word of the Lord." Christ is revealed as the Agent of the Father in Creation, just as He would be in Redemption.

  • The Nature of the Church
  • The Lord Jesus has not called us to a lonely walk through life, but rather to a Christianity characterized by assembly. His assembly - or church - is a theme of much of the New Testament, but it is a theme over-neglected in our day. Here we consider the nature and practice of church, looking to repent of our oversights and to reform our own assembly.
  • The Seven Sayings
  • The seven sayings of Christ from the cross each communicate gospel truth. His words were few, but profound. Each leads us deeper into an understanding of what he accomplished.
  • Thessalonians
  • The church in Thessalonica was conceived in conflict and born into crisis. After just three weeks of ministry, Paul was quietly slipped out of town to avoid a mob, leaving a congregation of new believers to face acrimony and opposition. Paul quickly sent Timothy to them, then two letters - the First and Second Letter to the Thessalonians. These letters address the gospel concerns of the young church, but also delve into the details of the Last Days to a remarkable extent. In the midst of external conflict, this church saw endured one but two major false teachings concerning eschatology in the first months of its existence! Paul answers both, and in so doing gives us a basis for a sound eschatology. Of even greater concern to the Apostle is the life of the church in the midst of persecution.
  • The Ten Commandments
  • Psalm 119 tells us that the commandment of God is "exceedingly broad." While His moral law may be memorized quickly, its application covers every area of life. Using the Ten Commandments as a framework, we will examine the precise moral code which is propagated throughout the Scriptures. Of course, no sinner may of his own effort keep this law perfectly. The study of the commandments thus always drives us back to Christ, the only hope for those who have broken God's perfect law.

  • The Unchanging God
  • This series of messages examines the question of God's immutability, particularly with regard to His interactions with men.